Sunday, June 30, 2013

National Park Series 5: Grand Teton and Yellowstone


Mammoth Hot Springs
Yellowstone is a mountain wild land, home to grizzly bears, bison, elks and wolves. It is the core of one of the last natural ecosystems in the Earth’s temperate zone and famous for remarkable geysers.

Dubbed ‘the mountains of the imagination", Grand Teton offers a beautiful landscape where visitors can explore over two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River and enjoy its serenity.

While millions of visitors go to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks to climb, hike, kayak, fish and see the wildlife, the American wilderness and the kind of mythic landscape that Norman MacLean had in mind when he wrote "Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it," attract many photographers.

These postcards come to Green Caviar Travel blog from my friend, Sherry Mullins – a very talented photographer.

#1 Grand Teton

 A River Runs Through It
 Postcard Perfect

#2 Grand Teton
A River Runs Through It
As seen from aboard rubber raft down Snake River


#3 Old Faithful (Yellowstone National Park)
Old Faithful erupts more frequently than any of the other big geysers, although it is not the largest or most regular geyser. Its eruption vary from every 44-125 minutes and lasts 1 1/2 to 5 minutes. It expels boiling water that reaches a height of 106-184 ft.


#4 Beehive Geyser
The favorite performer in the geyser basin and can be seen and/or photographed a short distance from Old Faithful. It is irregular and typically erupts once or twice daily and lasts 4-5 minutes. It projects a powerful water column to a height of 150-200 feet (higher than Old Faithful)

#5 Fumaroles
As seen from Upper Geyser Basin
Dead trees are not removed so as not to disturb the environment

As seen from the boardwalks near Old Faithful

#6 Mammoth Hot Springs

Spectacular terraces composed of travertine (calcium carbonate)


#7 Little Grand Canyon
Within Yellowstone lower loop

#8 Mt. Rushmore
Washington on the left


Sherry among the crowd of photographers
from National Geographic?
Note: All photos by Sherry Mullins






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